This blog post is a troll on Njoki Chege

I believe in freedom of speech. I believe in Press Freedom. What I don’t believe is that those freedoms are absolute. In 2015, a terrorist attack on the largely previously unknown French “Charlie Hebdo” publication left 14 people dead, after the paper published a cartoon mocking the Islamic Prophet Mohammed. There was no excuse, no justification for the taking of lives simply because they published what over 1.6 billion people, Muslims, would consider extremely offensive. However, the event brought about a debate on what freedoms we enjoy and how those freedoms can be enjoyed without giving credence to outright bigotry, racism and the degradation of others.

Since that time, Charlie Hebdo has published several other, openly racist, clearly bigoted cartoons, about migrants dying at sea and most offensive to date; a cartoon depicting a 2 year old refugee who died at sea, Aylan Kurdi, as a “future monkey rapist.”

Ideas are powerful, and words are powerful. They can build and they can destroy. The images of Aylan Kurdi’s father crying his eyes out, disgusted, humiliated and extremely aggrieved after seeing the disgraceful cartoon of his dead child, are going to haunt us all. History will judge us, for letting those who have the means, to harm, humiliate and degrade those who are the weakest amongst us.

I am not saying that Njoki Chege just picks at the weakest. But Ms Chege is irresponsible with her power. She is published in a national newspaper and each week without fail, Njoki Chege wreaks vitriol on those who have a lifestyle she despises.

Is she emotionally charged *UNSTABLE is the word I should use* when she writes this stuff? I doubt it. I think that Ms. Chege is simply looking for a way to sell papers. And that, in itself describes the problem in Kenya.

We have a media so keen on numbers and sales that they no longer are accountable for what they publish. There was a time when Kenyan Media Houses thought that they were capable of “self-regulation”. In the transition from the Moi Era to Kibaki, Kenyan Media Houses suddenly found themselves with a gift so precious that even American journalists should have been envious. It was the freedom to publish opinion, without fear of legal repercussion because at the time, the Media laws were not yet strict enough to curb excesses, or indeed, invite frivolous litigations.

And now, nearly 15 years later, we allow our media to utilize these hard won freedoms to publish views that, truly, are not just bigoted and offensive, they demean the humanity of half the population of Kenya. Njoki Chege writes pure misogyny, woven into her work that pettily picks at habits of a minority of Nairobi based people.

I consider myself a democratic thinking person. I abhor censor, and in as much as I may not agree or even like what Njoki writes, I acknowledge she has the right, nay, PRIVILEGE to write in a National paper. However, I feel it is important to point out that HER abject bigotry is not democratic; it is not worthy of publication and it is not in any way representative of any constitutional values or freedoms granted in Kenya.

Njoki Chege’s writing is an affront to press freedom. It is clear bigotry, narcissism, and insults directed at the very consumers of the Nation Newspapers. If Nation Media Group wanted us to know just how much they disdain us, all they need to do is print Njoki Chege.

Media Houses in Kenya keep claiming that they should be self-regulatory, but clearly, just by observing what the average weekend paper has the temerity to publish, this is not the case. When you have the power to shape millions of minds, and influence the decisions and sentiments of millions of people from diverse backgrounds it is quite wicked to use that power to push utter misogyny, bigotry, and backwardness.

Njoki Chege needs censure – not for her views, but for the utterly irresponsible nature of her expression.  To write blatant insults while claiming to be addressing issues such as feminism, abuses that even insult our own African natural hair, is abhorrent, unconscionable and RACIST.

Njoki Chege needs an editor – incidentally Nation Media Group fired a managing editor, Dennis Galava, whose editorial on 2nd January, they claimed “did not follow due process”. If a managing editor can be fired for doing his JOB, and writing an editorial that strongly criticizes the presidency, why can’t their writers be censured for insulting the public?

Njoki Chege needs to READ – yes dear, read a damn BOOK. Learn that feminism is not just about what women state on twitter or what they choose to do with their hair. Feminism, Njoki, is NOT *just* about equal rights for men and women. Feminism is the inherent notion that WOMEN ARE ALSO PEOPLE.

Njoki – Bloggers are not “any dimwit with an internet connection”; Bloggers are people who WRITE or produce content for a BLOG. You have a blog, Njoki Chege, did you also just insult yourself ? of course you did!

Njoki – The phrase “the scum of the earth” is not one you throw at every single group of people you decide to deride just to sell papers; rather it is surely reserved for your own kind, people who claim they are writers, who are published in national newspapers and use that platform to insult women, men, and the entire public, simply because you want to make money.

This blog post is a troll – I am trolling you back, Njoki Chege. I am using my online publication to troll you, to tell you that your misogyny and your hatred for ordinary Kenyans is offensive, bigoted, shallow, hypocritical, and laced with utter ignorance.

You have no idea how to spell – remember how you declared that fat women who have a “sedimentary”(what?!) lifestyle should “HIT THE JIM”?  Hit who? Utter idiocy.

Do you recall, (as you should!) how you decided that twitter feminists “do not believe in beautiful, long flowing weaves the rest of you spend so much money on”? Who believes in horse hair? Who has faith in synthetic hairs? Is this a religion for the completely stupid that you are pushing?

Your “writing” is a disgrace. Not only for its myriad grammatical errors and ridiculous spelling mistakes, it is an affront to our sensibilities. That you can write such garbage and not a single one of the (remaining) NMG editors notice how pathetic your composition is, tells us everything about the newspaper that publishes you.

The reason this is now an issue is because, in a country that has a fledgling democracy such as ours, Njoki Chege’s contemptuous rants cause more harm than anything. It is damaging the credibility of writers, publishers and the press across Kenya. It is wrong, offensive, bigoted, insulting to the public and plainly inexcusable behavior.

Charlie Hebdo is similarly bigoted. The difference between Kenya and France is this – we can see the hypocrisy and damage that support for open bigotry brings to a society and how violent and inciting the hatred and degradation spewed can be. There is no way of unlinking subsequent terror attacks on Muslims across France from the sheer nonsense published by Charlie Hebdo.

We, as Kenyans can choose not to go down the same path. Njoki Chege in her bigotry is no better than the “political bloggers” she labeled “no better than call girls.” I am not calling her a garden tool, merely quoting her. She is just as bad, and far more unsavory, inarticulate, and on sale.

 

 

 

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151 thoughts on “This blog post is a troll on Njoki Chege

  1. Thank you. First for criticizing her terrible writing, calling out her awful ideas and putting it so well. And, you did not insult her as a person- you are absolutely right, the papers are becoming clickbait and it sucks. Following and sharing this because you said what I wanted to say but could not fully articulate.

    Liked by 6 people

    1. It is impossible for me to insult her as a person – I do not know her! and I also don’t believe I can adequately address what is so wrong about her “writing” while at the same time, applying the same, absurd tools she uses – personal insults, degrading language and blatant hypocrisy. Njoki deserves dignity, even if she does NOT accord others that same dignity, and I value her ambition, I simply am quite offended, rightly at her abusive work. it is very abusive, unfair, uncritical, irrational and utterly unconscionable; it is an abhorrence.

      Liked by 3 people

      1. Amen. I think this sentence tells it all: ‘We have a media so keen on numbers and sales that they no longer are accountable for what they publish.’

        Liked by 4 people

      2. Very articulate piece,it not only addresses the issue at hand but a wide scope of issues on media freedom and responsibilities on the said freedom.

        Liked by 3 people

  2. Thank you Betty. Njoki Chege is a classic example of what internal misogyny is capable of. She is an agent of cyber violence and it’s unfortunate that we don’t have proper laws in Kenya to deal with her kind. The saddest thing about this is that she is a woman and in this day and age when we are struggling to make equality a reality…. She….. Through the media is taking us back

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Cyberviolence is not real violence get over it. Internalised misogyny is what feminists accuse any woman who doesn’t agree to their dogma and propaganda. Criticism is not inequality, no one is entitled to be liked by everyone and you’ll just have to deal with that

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Violence in words is real. Are not journalists right now being tried at the International Criminal Court for using media platforms to spread bigotry, incite violence that led to the deaths of thousands?
        Don’t bore us with this sort of ignorance, please.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. @Betty, there is a very big difference between what Sang is being accused of and what Njoki writes…………Sang is accused of inciting the killing of other people, Njoki just expresses her opinion. Ciku Muiruri has been penning unprintables against men for over a decade and a half now in the same paper yet you feminists still viewed her as a champion. Hypocricy

        Liked by 1 person

  3. It is true that Njoki Chege is generous with insults and harsh words. It is true that she criticizes almost everything if not everything.
    But it is also true that Njoki Chege is a very brainy woman. She is a very talented Blogger and her works are unmatched by any other Kenyan blogger’s.
    Sometimes I feel that jealousy is the only reason why other people critic Njoki Chege. She is so amazing! I have read her work since 2014 and I have always liked her ambition and courage to speak the truth. Of course her exaggerations are not quite to be celebrated, but I decided to take them positively because they are really funny, and we all know that at the end of it all it is never that serious.
    Please let Njoki Chege be.

    Liked by 2 people

      1. Njoki Chege isn’t the problem! She’s just a manifestation of the ongoing rot in Kenyan media. It’s about Twitter TTs and gaining followers. So, whatever gets the most traction finds its way to the paper. If you think I’m kidding, check out the tweets that Standard Digital Edition (SDE) puts out! It’s disgusting! Anybody can write raw insults, I mean, these blogs are endless (remember Media Madness?), but when these insulting blogs then find their way into a national paper, the most respected paper in East and Central Africa, the same paper I’ll be reading to search for answers on Eurobond (has anyone asked her whether she understands this subject?), then, it stops being about the writer and becomes more about the institutions inability to do its work diligently. But, as you said, Nation fired Galava for criticosong Uhuru…..I think that settles the case of the direction NMG is headed. As for Njoki, well, it’s a choice; read her rubbish and get annoyed or go kick small rocks on the street. I’ll do the latter. Great article!

        Liked by 1 person

    1. Sorry Gib,but I agree – we are all very envious of Njoki Chege’s success as Blogger numero uno. There has never been,and there shall never be! In Bloggsphere,she is alpha,and omega.Keep on reading brother – maybe one day she’ll take notice and give you a lash or two of her golden pen.

      Liked by 2 people

  4. I am glad I don’t read Njoki Chege.I elect to expend my time reading stuff of value. No matter how long she trends. Secondly, going through this article,I was wondering how people can be so gifted. I am so impressed by how you respond in neat, flowing prose. Choosing to link events abroad with situations within with such mastery. Still, I refuse to read Njoki Chege..

    Liked by 2 people

      1. First and foremost, this is good writing. Following right now. Secondly, there are writers and blogger out there who are not worth the stuff their works appear on (print or on-line). My fascination with Nyakundi vanished as soon as I encountered his grammar. Should the Lord return I hope He doesn’t use Nyakundi to reveal it. Njoki Chege, though entitled to an opinion, should also pen her words with caution for the feelings of her readers and larger audience. They say she studied at Daystar- the home of communication, so can she prove it and express herself with the responsibility of a journalist?

        Irresponsible behavior dictates that we shield her behind success and our imaginations of feminism. Who shields the women and men she writes about from psychological self-doubt and emotional distress?

        The sword cannot swing left without being drawn and sooner or later Ms Chege will draw her sword and take her own head. She already contradicts herself so it’s just a matter of time.

        Liked by 1 person

    1. I made up my mind to ignore her. I believe she is a ‘soft terrorist’ who do not target people with blazing guns and explosives but the one who has a negative point of view on people’s lifestyle…

      Liked by 2 people

  5. I used to follow you too on Twitter. I must say that a great number of times, you too sound a bit flawed in your arguments. It is always a little off in an overbearing way… More often than not, you trash other people’s opinions a la “My way or the highway”…. But let’s just say that this uproar is about Njoki Chege at the moment, so I’ll let you be.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Well, whoever you are, I am glad you stopped following me. I didn’t open my twitter account with you or anyone else, so of course my views remain fully that, MY way or the HIGHWAY – there is no room in my head for twitter strangers. You have problems allowing others to express themselves it seems, look at you coming onto my blog and complaining about my opinion – don’t you know what blogs are for?
      whats your twitter handle by the way, would love to block you.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. That is unnecessary. Sour, vindictive. Not any good at taking it in the chin. As a blogger you should be able to take criticism without resorted to petty, personalised brawls.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. As a guest, you should try the same. Its only sour or vindictive when rudeness is met with equal measure by me? but not when arrogant and obnoxious characters take cheap personal shots simply because I wrote a blog post they do not agree with but lack the intellect to actually talk about the post.

        petty, childish and whiny.

        Liked by 1 person

  6. Njoki Chege is just a blogger like all and sundry that she can imagine. except that her blogs are written free from freedom but under the whims of the lowest bidder, there is also some so called editors who dictate to her how many words, vocabulary, blah blah…..

    Liked by 3 people

  7. I may not agree with Njoki’s choice of words…..but I agree with her about these ‘guns for hire’. After politicians, our biggest enemy is the ‘political bloggers’. The tribal profiling and venom they spit is abhorring. I also agree with you……freedom of speech is not absolute.

    Liked by 3 people

  8. So on point her blog is the last nail on the coffin on a society womenfolk who are battling with westernization and certain ‘beauty’ standards that rate a woman’s value to the narrowness of her waist and the width of their hips. The articles are only meant to sink the already low self esteem of our sisters. She is an enemy to our unborn African daughters. Its a pity that a reknown media house like nmg should be the one to accord such bigotry a platfotm .

    Liked by 3 people

  9. Am Not a Journalist but i do recall she stated once, hers is opinion based writting and theres nothing she forces down anyones throat. So why should one appear offended yet everyone is free to express themselves. Truth is really bitter to consume i should say. According to my own opinion she puts the truth in the best way without fear or favor.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I wonder at how you view your own behavior, coming to MY blog to complain about MY views, don’t you feel silly being such a hypocrite? whats it like walking around being living irony and pushing your mediocrity like this? I am curious.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Well – this is where you are wrong. I don’t have to respect your opinion, especially when its clear garbage. Garbage opinions, like yours, which are further enhanced with insults, are not respectable or even palatable. Thank you for your display by the way, the world needed your example of what walking manure looks like.

      Liked by 1 person

    2. What was your point.,coz you did not write anything.Kindly give intellectuals ample time to engage and sharpen their worldview since you are clearly challenged upstairs.Google what a *blogger* is.You will find us here.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. Good read..I really like how you have pointed out the most important details on what to give to the public when you are writing. Words have power to influence.
    Thank You Betty for such an amazing article.
    God Bless You.

    Liked by 2 people

  11. The “but” brigade of freedom of speech is exasperating. Freedom of speech is freedom to say even what others may not agree with or find offensive otherwise its censorship. Charlie Hebdo has every right to publish whatever it likes(which isn’t even racist but most fainting couch protesters miss the nuance). The idea that what you hold dear should not be criticized even on a national publication is laughable. If your ideas have any merit then it would be self evident and would never need shelter from any form of criticism

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Its amusing how you ironically seem offended by others criticizing what is published while claiming that what is published is an enjoyment of an absolute – so to you, freedom of speech means that no one ELSE has the freedom to criticize what is published using that freedom?
      Must be very interesting in your mind, to be this irrational is quite, special. but of course, those who use their rights to degrade others will always claim that their OWN exclusive right, not to to be extended to their targets of derision. that in and of itself is abuse of those rights. You are not the only one with free speech.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. You are welcome to criticize just as I am welcome to criticize you. Freedom of speech is the gift that keeps on giving. And even those who use those rights to degrade others are free to do so. If no criminal action has been committed then any prosecution for said speech is prosecution of thought crimes

        Liked by 1 person

  12. Well, waitherero, you are getting emotional at Njoki Chege and her fans for no reason. I admit this is the first time I have read you. You have excellent writing skills, but when you want to speak against the most creative, hilarious and bold blogger I know (read Njoki Chege) it makes me feel like I will never read you again. And before you reply to this as rudely as you have replied to the others, cool down first and get it in your head that we are people too and we deserve respect. And so does Njoki Chege.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Well Gibson, welcome to my blog. once again, I appreciate you coming here to read my views. As you can see, I also can respond to Njoki Chege, and the various commentators whose replies I have allowed, without edit or censure. I am that magnanimous. You should try it yourself.

      Liked by 1 person

  13. I have enjoyed reading your piece the same way I enjoy those of Njoki Chege. While reading her articles, I ask myself what could be wrong with me that I don’t have such a perfect mastery of the Queens language. Nevertheless, I know the answer to some of the questions regarding my lack of skills in writing. Interest! You both serve the same purpose-that of entertaining us. Both of you are, clearly, talented.
    Keep it up.

    Liked by 2 people

  14. I agree with you my sister that Njoki Chege needs to tame her rudeness and hatred for people’s lifestyles which she despises. Good article but I feel you over used the word ‘bigotry’

    Liked by 1 person

  15. Actually, it should be Charlie ‘Hebdo’ and not Charlie ‘Hedbo’ as you have used four times.

    I didn’t understand what the fuss was about Njoki Chege until I read, for curiosity’s sake, a few of her posts. Back then she groused a lot about folk who drive ‘blue Subaru’ cars. I didn’t think she was hateful nor do I think she despises the (group) of people she writes about – bloggers, fat women, etc.

    Is she misogynistic as you have claimed? I doubt that as she bashes womenfolk in equal measure as she bashes the menfolk. She thrives and revels in stirring up controversy with her commentary on contemporary issues in our society and this (often) rubs people (like you, Betty) the wrong way.

    As you put it, newspaper sales are dwindling and yet Njoki Chege’s articles, with their rouble-rousing, increase sale volumes. The (remaining) editors have given her ‘carte blanche’ to write as she pleases. Let her be.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Firstly – thank you for pointing out the error in spelling on “Hebdo”, a confusion on two letters within the noun, which I have corrected.
      When Njoki wrote about “having your way” with a woman who has “blacked out on shisha”, THAT is misogyny. When she uses her platform to insult and degrade people, en mass, for their lifestyle, their bodies, their jobs, their property and even for being vocal on feminism, political topics, that is bigotry.
      That you are unable to understand the work you enjoy reading is laced with insults and abuse that are not only malicious but deny entire demo-graphs dignity speaks to your lack of finesse.
      “Let her be”. Have we now become so irresponsible that even criticism should be shunned? You seem keen to encourage and support her sort of “writing”, work that is entirely bereft of any conscience, and in turn, refuse others the opportunity to point out what is wrong, inherently, about allowing blatant abuse to be published in a national newspaper. But, let me use your logic. Let me be.

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      1. Perhaps I didn’t come out clearly. I would never consciously buy a newspaper just because I wanted to read her tripe; it is not ‘the work I enjoy reading’. Like I said, I only looked up her posts after she gained notoriety with her writing. I have not read her posts in a long while as I am least bothered (unlike you).

        I imagine her brief at NMG is to churn out controversial posts in order to draw traffic to its blogs and (maybe) increase newspaper sales for those who do not have internet access. However, I am amazed that you and those who seem (so) irked by her writing are not calling out the editors and seemingly only directing your missiles at her. Without the paper, she doesn’t have an ‘audience’. When I wrote ‘let her be’, it wasn’t in her support; rather, I meant to ask you to not allow your heart to be consumed by apathy towards her. But of course, fulminating on your blog is therapy.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Oliver – You seem to have ignored the entire blog post, in which I CLEARLY talk about NMG and their irresponsible publications.
        That tells me that you either didn’t read the blog post and thus are busy churning fallacies, or that you did not understand what I posted and should go back and read it.
        Njoki Chege rants. Ranting means she is “irked” by XYZ issue, person or activity. You are amazed that I am “irked” at the abusive language she uses when she is “irked”? Hilarious. Thank you for entertaining me. One blog post on her, and you think I am consumed, because, anybody who criticizes published work, is WRONG according to you, “bothered”, “irked”. Criticism happens when something bothers, irks, or offends people. A blog post to express that is not consumption, it is expression.
        It REALLY bothers you that someone dared criticized her? well, I should warn you, several OTHER writers have similarly raised alarm over what she pens, and there are MANY blogs, articles and opinions, some even published by NMG that strongly criticize her and the newspaper for their anti-social publications.
        I hope you enjoyed “fulminating” on my blog, I am magnanimous so I wont charge you for the therapy it provided.

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  16. There you go! justifying that women are their own enemies.
    why do women criticize other women? If both of you are writers and bloggers, then let each one of you do her thing and support each other. Women please support your fellow women. We shall never seem to move forward when we try to find mistakes in others. Embrace the positive side always and move forward. We can never be fully perfect.Just let her write, we shall read. And you please, do write too, we shall enjoy your work. Thank you.

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    1. Men do criticize other men too…………we just don’t have this silly movement that makes us universal victim thus obligating us never to criticize anybody of our gender even when the criticism is necessary.

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  17. If people could just learn to love and be proud of who they are,no matter how big or how small they are,articles,and what people write or say will never bother them.Chege may be mean but if one could just sit down,think deeply of what Njoki says and write to confirm how wrong she is,with alot of bitterness..Eish! bad for your soul

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I partially agree with you. But I have to say that it is not enough to like yourself, thus create some sort of psychological bubble in which you think you are safe, you must also address situations where you (the public) are the target of abuse by an irresponsible journalist. Now, if only everyone thought THAT highly of themselves, we certainly wouldn’t be having a National newspaper that would dare publish insults to the public, or have people trying to molly-coddle anti-social behavior.

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  18. Betty I can’t deny what a great piece this is just as no one can deny there’s a lot of TRUTH in Njoki Chege’s pieces. I may not like the way she articulates her writings but I sure love the fact that it’s ‘mostly’ the TRUTH! And just like you have the right to criticize Njoki Chege so do we have the right not to agree with you. The one thing that bloggers have that you don’t(since you claim to be one) is ability to handle criticism maturely.Learn to take criticism, not everyone can lick your boots!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Truth is never shrouded in insults or bigotry. Criticism is welcome – see how you were able to make your statement here, nobody asking you to comment or lick..
      You have the right to disagree, you don’t have the right to be abusive. That is the truth. Your comment is immature, by the way.

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      1. Betty, I do not believe this respondent was abusive to you. He simply actuated his response with exclamation marks. I do not read Njoki Chege much for the simple reason I do not listen to Classic FM in the morning, its a long list of boring stuff we have heard over years. I however feel you come on too strong in your responses, you are armoured already when your followers simply want to engage you further. By posting on a public blog you invite everyone to comment and give their opinion, it is then not right to tell someone to get off your blog, however it would have been made private. (I am a blogger too..smiles)

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      2. Thanks for your comment Achieng. If you could kindly not be so partial and ignore the clear rudeness displayed by the respondent, only to make commentary on my own reply, that would clear any sort of hypocrisy that causes. Because, as you can see, I allow any and everyone to make comment, including you, without censure. As you make commentary, remember you will receive a response. Rudeness for rudeness, and intellect for intellect. Perhaps if you were keen on what those who actually read the blog had to say, you would see the sort of engagement we had.
        I certainly don’t have to tolerate personalized affronts pushed as “criticism” of my WORK.
        I appreciate your observations, and by the way, do give me a link to your blog wold love to read your work.

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  19. It’s ironical how you criticize Njoki Chege and still refuse to be criticized. The one thing that bloggers have that you don’t(since you call yourself one)is the ability to take criticism, even if you don’t necessarily agree with an opinion.Not everyone will lick your boots, Betty. And again it’s malicious how rudely you reply people whose only sin is not agreeing with your opinion. I may NOT agree with Njoki Chege’s pieces entirely but I swear she always has a POINT. Otherwise, nice piece.

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    1. Malice is when you claim you are criticizing someone but are actually insulting them. Its amusing how you have, repeatedly insulted me, rudely, then get worked up when I respond in kind.
      You can swear Njoki has a point, I think she doesn’t especially when she cannot write without abusing people. Otherwise, have a nice day.

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  20. Yes I know I’m immature because I don’t agree with you. If being abusive is telling you not everyone can lick your boots then you have a problem.

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    1. “Yes I know I’m immature because I don’t agree with you. If being abusive is telling you not everyone can lick your boots then you have a problem.”

      You are immature because you choose to be abusive my dear. and yes, claiming that “not everyone can lick your boots” is an insult. You know this, and you are the one with the problem.

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  21. Interesting and well written blog. I agree with alot of what you write. However I also do love Njoki’s writing. You two are very similar. Newspapers outlets are primarily a business so it is proper if staff work to earn their pay. You however seem to have come full circle from the days you fought with a Government Spokesman who made similar sentiments about you that you now hold against Njoki.

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  22. Thanks Betty for taking the time to call out Njoki Chege for her articles’ bigotry.
    I am currently reading ‘Writing Feature Stories’ by Matthew Ricketson. I came across this part in the book, and I thought of her;

    “Bad columnists, and sadly there are many, inflame prejudices rather than inspire debate…….. Often pundits are little more than crude opinion-mongers or, what Westbrook Pegler, himself a columnist, once described as, ‘the deep-thinking, hair-trigger columnist who knows all the answers just offhand and can settle great affairs with absolute finality three or even six days a week’. Their arrogance extends to their disdain for research, let alone getting out of the office to do any on-the-ground reporting work.”

    I believe Njoki doesn’t do even little research on the allusions she uses in her article. I can only describe her work as ‘lazy rants’. Unfortunately, they are so disastrous to the society.

    Liked by 2 people

  23. Whoa! Cool post that was long overdue..if Njoki Chege does what she does for ratings..she should wizen up..and yeah, “if Daily Nation wanted us to know how much they disdain us, they should print Njoki Chege..”

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  24. First, Njoki Chege is not consistent in her ideology but consistent in her writing pattern. She depicts cheapness of mind when you read her fifth article but I think the NMG gives her space coz she’s crazy. It adds value coz she captures attention.
    Based on this article, you prove to just have good writing skills but your mind depicts cheapness on the first read. You didn’t have to respond rudely to those visited your blog and wrote what you did not like. You should swallow it and smile that they gave you traffic. I hear traffic on your blog translates to some money in some way.
    Don’t reply to this comment.

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  25. I am going to be as bluntly honest as possible
    1. Njoki Chege is sick, she needs psychological help.
    2. Nation Media is headed by jerks, and are a shame to those who fought for the freedom of expression.
    3. Waitherero, dawa ya moto ni moto, write an insultful piece on Njokis tiny ass, shapeless face etc and watch it trend an entire day, that way you will send the message home.
    4.=ignore my spelling errors =

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  26. I am not even mad at Njoki chege,The bigger problem is a National Media house that will print utter rubbish, when they have the advantage to reach such a huge audience, instead of printing positive and forward thinking articles, they set us back hundreds of years by limiting our growth, the only reason they print such nonsense from Njoki Chege is to just insight the public and cause chaos, so shameful as they are supposed to do the opposite. They need to be called out on their lack of responsibility ! As for Njoki , let her burn her bridges.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. If I may add this, with all due respect, Betty, I don’t think replying to insults with insults (trust me I understand the instinct) shows that you’ve “accepted” criticism, which we all open ourselves to every time our articles land on the internet. I think replying to insults with reasonabke arguments is a mark of just pure intellect.

      Somebody once told me “Wilson, you can’t control how other people behave, you can only control how you react to it” and to be fair, some of your reactions have left me surprised. Surprised because your article is very well thought out and articulated. But that doesn’t mean we all have to agree with it. Some of your replies have actually been directed at the character of the subjects. But you don’t know these people (I think) so, why would you attack their character? If you repay insults with insults, aren’t you propagating just one of the ideologies that you have so vehemently disagreed with in your article?

      Healthy debate isn’t shaped by the reader, it’s for you to turn any sort of stupid, insulting, downright dumb argument into a debate bereft of emotion. That’d be my challenge to you. Or you can just ignore those comments.

      As I said though…Great article

      Like

  27. Thank you for pointing out the right issues with Njoki Chege. It is shocking how a major Media House allows that kind of rubbish to be published, such a shame. First time on this blog and I like it.

    Liked by 1 person

  28. Nice piece. Though, I don’t agree with a couple of things especially on her business model being compared to people actually and honestly invested in their offensive and often evil thoughts(Charlie Hebdo) and the way to handle her and her clickbait-oriented writing.

    Njoki Chege lacks the skill set to make us think, so she makes us angry instead. Rather than associating her operational model to Charlie Hebdo(who are politically motivated), she is closer to Ann Arbour and Katie Hopkins. Also, unlike US politician Ann Coulter, who says hateful racist things, Njoki Chege is not as honestly invested in her arguments(whether hateful or not) as Ann Coulter is in ideas like racially-motivated US immigration control. Njoki is only fully invested in her sales and click targets.

    Ann Arbour(Dear Fat People-girl), struggled in obscurity for 10 years as a stand-up comedian and used to make positive motivational videos that received low view counts on YouTube. So, she found the easiest way to fame – making people angry.

    Katie Hopkins is a middle aged British woman who says stuff like this:
    1. On obesity and hiring fat people: “If you are obese you look lazy.”
    2. On girls called Charmaine: “‘Hi, this is my daughter Charmaine’. I hear: ‘Hi, I am thick and ignorant’.”

    The only way we can take power from such people is by retracting the access they have to our emotions. The knowledge that the Njoki Chege’s of this world are not as invested in the arguments they are making is empowering. In other words she is a troll and the number one rule on the internet is Do Not Feed The Troll. So, even pointing out her misogyny is not as meaningful because she would not have voiced hatred to women if it didn’t increase clicks and sales.

    Why censor her when we can discuss her act? Arguments about the psychological gimmicks(to induce anger and hurt) she uses and the motivations(to increase sales) will take more of her power away than arguments about what she has said, social responsibility or how much she has offended people.

    Liked by 2 people

  29. No doubt that Ms Chege is a talented and imaginative writer. As a believer in the freedom of expression, i would defend her “unto death”, for her freedom to express her opinions.

    Her perception of life, people and all she writes about is no different from what you and I have, the only difference is, she has a national platform to air her’s. I many times disagree with her’s, but hey, whom I’m I to judge?

    The only issue i usually have with her, is the style and tone of her writings. She makes known of what she feels about people, but in a rather insultive and strong-worded manner. All pieces by columnists and commentators are personal opinions. Many times very highy controversial and partisan. The only reason they do not elicit the kind of beef and bile Njoki’s do, is the manner in which they make their opinions known. If she could tone down on that, there is absolutely nothing wrong with Njoki airing whatever notions she does about people and things.

    Like

  30. No doubt that Ms Chege is a talented and imaginative writer. As a believer in the freedom of expression, i would defend her “unto death”, for her freedom to express her opinions.

    Her perception of life, people and all she writes about is no different from what you and I have, the only difference is, she has a national platform to air her’s. I many times disagree with her’s, but hey, whom I’m I to judge?

    The only issue i usually have with her, is the style and tone of her writings. She makes known of what she feels about people, but in a rather insultive and strong-worded manner. All pieces by columnists and commentators are personal opinions.

    Many times very highly controversial and partisan. The only reason they do not elicit the kind of beef and bile Njoki’s do, is the manner in which they make their opinions known. They are mote subtle and mild. If she could tone down on that, there is absolutely nothing wrong with Njoki airing whatever notions she does about people and things.

    Liked by 1 person

  31. Thanks Betty, nice piece.Whenever you put out a body of work,two things happen; one is that you let people in on your thoughts and two is that you attracts sentiments both positive and negative ones. There is an indescribable beauty of such thoughts that we all appreciate. With Njoki Chege’s,its the boldness,audacity,eloquence etc with which she styles her articles.She can also come off as impetuous and a little abrasive but that’s all in style and delivery. That said, she employs a great deal of satire in her writing which depending on one’s temperament,could be adjudged raw and vulgar. But in all she has given her best at the time.
    You, Betty on the other hand have given us a critique of her work. By so doing, you open yourself to the same forces of sentiment. There’s beauty in your work but people will adjudge you perhaps using even harsher standards than Njoki’s. Roll out the red carpet.

    About freedom,all are free but freedom is just a means to an end never an end in itself. Freedom contribute to the greater good in society. My two cents.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I don’t judge Njoki Chege, I critique her work. I am able to make this distinction between the writer and the writing, and I am also able to tell what sarcasm is (humor woven into analysis) verses insulting statements (“a face only a mother could love”).
      Who am I to critique Njoki Chege? Why I am Betty Waitherero, a woman with a view that is valid. I am in every position to judge her work published for exactly that reason, to be judged, analyzed and critiqued.

      Like

  32. Betty first and foremost thank you for calling out consumers on their lucklustre attitude. Secondly, thank you for standing up against Njoki’s rants.
    I made a conscious decision long ago not to enable her. She is a junkie. High on her shallow writing and gets off on belittling others. So as a consumer, I decided to black her out. I don’t share her work on social media, neither do I stop by her blog or NMG’s online platform for anything.
    Consumers should try that. If we all boycotted her rants, the world would be a better place.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. You have stated very well how we as consumers can express our dissatisfaction with the publications that are egregious. I agree, there is power in consumer decisions, but at the same time, I know that unchecked, such publications can become the norm, and spread across the Kenyan newspapers. What will we do then? can we really boycott all newspapers? its a challenge to all of us, don’t you think?

      Like

  33. I normally don’t read Njoki Chege; only time I did, was when a friend sent me a link to one of her articles that had something to do with women and cooking. I never was a fan of the kitchen and I still don’t cook on the regular. Neither was I offended by her opinion. My culinary skills or lack therefore don’t define me as a person and/or as a woman.
    Njoki Chege is a young woman trying to make a living in this city and we all know too well that is very difficult. She was wise enough to look closely and carve a niche for herself as a journalist bydiscovering exactly what sells in Kenya – insults and controversy. Doubting me? Check out our social media pages. There is a serious deficiency of intellectually stimulating discussions, enticing debates and witty clever comebacks just insults. Don’t agree with government policies? just issue an insult that ought to fix that mess. Not happy with the stand taken by the opposition on a national issue? Hurl an insult that ought to straighten it out. Unhappy with Njoki Chege’s article? which is the vilest name to call her? Read Betty Waitherero’s blog and didn’t like what she wrote? where is the Kenyan insult dictionary at? What really gets my goat on social media is that you can’t tell the difference between the class four drop-out and the PhD holder, the insults are the same.But I digress.
    Nation Media House is a corporate entity, it exists to make money for its shareholders. They are in the information business and making a shilling while at it. The gorier, the messier, the better – husband stabs wife, wife burns husband, bomb blows off etc. Bad news makes for ugly headlines and ugly headlines make for good money. I have a theory that newspaper sales grossed the highest when there was great tragedy in this country. So where does Njoki Chege come in? she is bad news and good money.
    Njoki Chege is not the problem, neither is the Daily Nation to blame for letting her column run for so long to the chagrin of some and the dismay of others. The case with Njoki Chege and the Nation is the case with politics in this country; the leaders we vote in are as good or as bad as the voters, the writers that we read are as good or as bad as the readers. Njoki Chege and the Daily Nation are just serving us what we want and what we clearly enjoy; if we want a better newspaper menu we should develop a finer taste for good pieces and they will be served.

    Like

  34. Judging from your comments and the last few paragraphs of your article, if you had a similar platform as Njoki Chege, you would have taken a similar route. You all display similar characteristics, that is, use of insults towards your critics. Constructive criticism is always accepted

    Like

    1. Thank you. May I say you also are not distinguishable from all the other people on the internet, who look for platforms to spout your opinion which isn’t criticism, simply childish personal attacks on individuals you don’t know, and whose blogs you don’t care to read at all. You aren’t special Cedric. not at all.

      Like

  35. Hi Betty. I found your article reflective and concise. As much as you seem to want to make all your readers agree with you, but then remember not everyone appreciates logic and rationale even those served hot.

    Like

  36. I’ve not read Njoki Chege (she came in after I gave up on the Friday & Saturday editions of Daily Nation. I’m now hanging onto Sunday’s).

    I did get to see her on the Trend when she was defending her fat shaming article. She was so unbelievably flippant I just switched channels. I did wonder though: NMG is looking out for its bottom-line; I get that. BUT at the expense of its brand? Half the time the paper reads like a rag which was not what it originally was…

    A wise man once said if you can’t explain it to a 6 yr old, you do not truly understand it yourself.
    We all speak about freedom of expression, that it is not THAT serious (notice this is always the first line of defense when someone is being an asshole?)

    I wonder though, if you had a 10 or 12 yr old, who is basically trying to grasp what it means to be a decent human being. Let’s say said child (God forbid) read her articles. How do you (as an adult) explain Njoki’s school of thought (which seems to boil down to gleefully tearing down another human being in the name of being ‘real’) as Okay? As healthy? As having no ‘real’ impact? and yes, the daily nation is not only available in some school libraries (including primary schools), but as kids we were encouraged to read it.

    Some argue that maybe NMG is struggling to get good, creative local writers who can write on social issues. I’m like really?! Pick up a copy of UP magazine and check out the likes of Wanuri or Adam Kiboi. Prowl the blogsphere and read people like Aleya. They’re fucking brilliant and would sit at a global table of their peers and talk like equals. Hell, even Oyunga Pala (who I didn’t always agree with) was not only a brilliant writer but he never reveled in the offensive or resorted to cheap parlor tricks to ‘sell’ his column.

    Yes, do not feed the troll. I totally agree BUT this is a national (mainstream) paper not an internet platform. We Kenyans are always been asked to support local content and as consumers we have the right to hold said publications to high standards. I don’t think asking a writer and NMG to have a code is too much to ask as a reader. Is it?

    Liked by 2 people

  37. I may not agree with Njoki’s way of words, but if you look deeper into what she writes it’s actually satire, she is criticising society using simple language that every average person understands, she is criticising, the societal hypocrisy in Kenya.

    I do not think she personally has a thing against Subaru drivers or fat women, she for example used Subaru drivers as a symbol for eg. immature, arrogant and shallow men, just like in Europe you use BMW X6 drivers with flashy watches and polo shirts for the same, it doesn’t mean that all the men with all of the above are arrogant or shallow.

    Regarding fat women, I do agree she used foul language and that was wrong and offensive, but all she wanted to say is, women who grow fat because they do not exercise and eat junk food need to rethink their lifestyles because they are going to pay heavily at the end with their health and heavy hospital bills however, it doesn’t mean that every fat woman is leading an unhealthy lifestyle. She wasn’t criticising the women personally but the lifestyle choices, just like she does to other hypocritical tendencies in Kenya, but I do agree her language was pretty foul and there should be a limit when it comes to that.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. @ Vienna: Whispers, Daily Show with Jon Stewart, Govt inspector, Caitlin Moran. Those are a few popular examples of satire. Njoki’s articles? I don’t think so (maybe they are an attempt at satire that didn’t quite hit the mark? I don’t know)

      Liked by 1 person

  38. The best way is her to be stopped from publishingv in the newspaper. Even if you don’t like it, it might end up in your house, remember, ” gazeti ya leo, itafunga nyama kesho. Coincidentary the page used might be article by Njoki’s

    Like

  39. Betty ,thank you so much for inner defination of who Njoki Chege is. To those who try to shoot hot pebbles toward Betty and try to be noticed you shouldnt expect Betty to lick your boots too, I see immature comments and old men loaded with personal disease, ok am saying stop being personal. You visited the blog right? Then relax,quench your thirst Mr.
    The key problem eminates from the editors(read what happened to Galava). The editors control every source of news, they tend to shift the “educative, informative’ news that everybody locked on their mind to a mere gutter press.You see Njoki if I may language her, she is a ‘hustler’, at the end of the day she does not care how the news may impact the common reader, like boom! ‘Hey I will drop a liner ,and yes Nation will be damn rich” . What about the damage she has caused? You have a sister and may be she wouldnt love to be fat but ok she is fat anyway, Njoki here with her poor grammer comes and makes it even more worse. My problem is not Njoki. My concern is we have humans who recognize this being yet that shouldnt be the case. Most of her writings is utter vague not that am trying to overlook her, we need to peruse very well what Betty has drafted, if you are lazy ass stop commenting then, it is not a must.Read and widen your knowledge, you will agree with Betty.

    Like

  40. She began by insulting poor men and men who drive Subarus and you feminists loved her, the moment she expressed her displeasure on fat women you all went BEZERK because according to feminism, you can insult anyone but never a woman.

    Like

      1. Of course I have a problem with feminists, but being off topic and irrelevant? No, my post is very valid. Your whole article criticizes Njoki from the bigoted feminist point of view and I just responded to that.

        Like

  41. Hi Betty. I think no, I know you are an amazing writer and your thoughts are well put especially in this particular piece. I applaud you for that. I read Njoki Chege’s articles and find them quite interesting. Now interesting here shall mean that at times I agree with her and at times I do not. But does that make me bitter/angry/ insert all feelings easily invoked..? Nope! She has strong sentiments on women who wear weaves and Lord knows I cannot wait to fix my next micros! I just read and laugh and marvel at her work, that’s her opinion what does it have to do with me? Please appreciate that the woman is talented. Her articles are NOT personal. Emancipate yourself (and everyone else here) from thinking her words are personal attacks. I invite you to scrutinize her words, she actually never personally mentions anyone and people simply choose to fill the blanks with their names- story of “if the shoe fits..” And yes Betty, many do think like her and we don’t have to agree with it otherwise why are the papers selling? On whether she deserves to be featured on the newspapers, refer above. Her thinking and boldness is just different, Imagine if all of us thought the color pink was cute..

    Like

  42. “Njoki Chege needs an editor – incidentally Nation Media Group fired a managing editor, Dennis Galava, whose editorial on 2nd January, they claimed “did not follow due process”. If a managing editor can be fired for doing his JOB, and writing an editorial that strongly criticizes the presidency, why can’t their writers be censured for insulting the public?”…..I can’t comprehend why she is till at NMG when Galava is gone!!! It is really sad that what really matters to the media is what we say about the president, nobody else cares about the well being of the rest of the citizens, like we ain’t people!! It couldn’t get worse when even generation ‘Y’ concentrate on misleading articles from Njoki, what are we trying to teach young bloggers when publishing those kind of articles on National Newspaper? I choose not to insult her as a person because I obviously do not know her. Well put Betty! you have said it all.

    Like

  43. Heeee Betty. Rereading this blogpost. Mad writing skills lady. Spot on! Spot on! I’ve been going through the comments and one thing strikes odd in some of them is the notion that by YOU critiquing a fellow woman, you’re somewhat complicit in oppressing womenfolk. I think women should be free to express themselves and even point out mistakes that other women may be making in our quest toward full humanity.

    One thing I notice daily is that women who blatantly abuse other women (in sexist ways) are always celebrated by most people. It is always one more excuse that forces of patriarchy use to validate oppression of women.

    Moreover, I’ve never bought that bullshit that for feminism to prosper, all women have to hold hands and sing kumbaya…we, women, just like men can vary in opinion. We are different….and we can agree to disagree without insulting other women. For Njoki to metaphorically represent women bloggers call girls, is to reinforce the notion that call girls are evil or morally bankrupt. Again, I ask, why do we, as a society see prostitution as a woman’s problem? Why do we focus on the ostensible supply of this commodity, not the demand? These prostitutes don’t have the nights by themselves, do they? So where are men in conversations involving prostitutes? (that’s another story for another day).

    What I’m saying is, we, women, can’t always agree on everything; but that doesn’t negate the obvious sexism in the world and it must be pointed out.

    So, you’re right. I fully agree with you. Njoki Chege is a sexist, atleast her articles are whether she’s aware or not. If it’s the latter, we owe her a duty to let her know, which you have done perfectly!

    All in all, I love how you’ve addressed the hair bit….natural hair/ beauty and what it means. Seriously, who, in this day and age should be casting aspersions on women for dumping horse hair? You’ve stood up when it matters Betty. I just love this post for a million reasons. I’ll bookmark it for future references.

    Like

  44. Succinct!
    I like it, indeed persons in privileged positions shouldn’t abuse it
    Let’s move away from the business of business is business

    Like

  45. Njoki Chege is a talented writer.. I don’t agree with everything she writes (and mostly I don’t care).. But I like her sense of humour… Her blogs are just hilarious.

    Like

  46. Still loving this post. Interesting comments across the board. Rock on Betty. You were out for blood with this one. Good work.

    Like

  47. The problem isn’t Njoki. The problem is NMG that gives a platform. This would not be published in many of those countries Kenya benchmarks against. People take the time to sue (and it is hard but they do it anyway).

    Here people don’t sue when buildings fall on them for being badly built, they dont sue when they lose a loved one in a hospital to bad treatment and they certainly dont sue when a newspaper calls them fat and asks them to get thin or die.

    Something has to change and action is what is needed.

    Like

  48. Hi. The Charlie Hebdo critique at the beginning was, I felt, a little inaccurate. They employed sarcasm to show how absurd the anti-migrant sentiment in Europe was. Well written article however.

    Like

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